Skipping church and mortal sin

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This topic contains 33 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Bernardine 8 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #1626

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:24frjv2y]Are people in the state of mortal sin if they choose to skip church on weekends? I have some Catholic neighbors that go to my church every once in a while, and they admit they skip sometimes. The times they do attend church, I notice they receive the Eucharist. I am just hoping they are not in the state of mortal sin when they receive it. [/color:24frjv2y]

    #8010

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    Yes, the magisterium still teaches that it is a mortal sin to miss Mass.

    http://www.aboutcatholics.com/worship/w … ch_sunday/

    http://www.catholic.com/thisrock/2000/0007fea2.asp

    #8011

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:2if3ey72]Awesome, thanks for that great info. I thought a read a verse in the Bible a while back that said something like this, “those who receive the Body of Christ in the state of mortal sin, seek damnation onto themselves”. If you know what verse I am trying to refer to, could you please point me to it so I can get the accurate verse? Also, if someone skips church, therefore is in the state of mortal sin, and if they were to die in a car accident the next day or whatever the case may be, would they go to hell? By the way, my wife got confirmed today! I’m happy happy happy! [/color:2if3ey72] <img src=” title=”Very Happy” />

    #8012

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    I just brought this up in a thread with Ron the other day: <img src=” title=”Smile” />

    [quote:12uhn8pk]”Therefore whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord unworthily will have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord.” (1 Cor. 11:27)[/quote:12uhn8pk]
    As far as “if X happens and I die the next day would I go to hell?” no one can really answer that. It may be that in that moment one truly repents of sin while clearly having no opportunity to go to confession and will go to heaven.

    Congratulations to your wife! <img src=” title=”Very Happy” />

    #8013

    weather
    Member

    I agree with your statement missing mass is a motal sin,unless one is very sick or in the northern states extreme weather conditions.I know the Church is packed on Christmas and Easter(lots of people I see only then)My ? is why does the Church say one has to goto Church and receive communion once a year(perferably on Easter)?.Is that so one remains a Catholic in good standing?I think in local Church’s there should be homily’s on this,cause I bet lots of Catholic’s don’t know it’s a mortal sin to miss mass.

    #8014

    Benedict
    Member

    A homily about the sin of missing mass sort of misses the point. The people who need to hear it are not there and the people who are there do not need to hear it.

    #8026

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:237w2ywt]I could not have said it any better. Basically it is up to the laity to evangelize on this matter. I printed out the information Jon gave to me in his post, and I sent it to my parents. I am trying to get them to understand the significance and grave matter of mortal sin. I also had them purchase the CCC about 4 months ago and I told them where to look on the topic of mortal sin. I called my mom up the other day and mentioned about the CCC she bought, and she referred to it as the “Bible”. So she obviously hasn’t even opened the book up yet, and she didn’t listen to me when I told her what was inside the CCC. I printed out information from Catholic Answers on who can receive communion too, and sent it to them. I know both if them are in mortal sin because they skip church a lot, and I am hoping they realize the spiritual state they are in. This weekend my niece (Goddaughter) is celebrating her First Communion. It will be the first time in about 7 years I will be attending church with my parents. It will be interesting to see if they choose to receive Communion or not. If they choose not to, they listened to me and read up on it. If they do choose to receive Communion, they will have obviously ignored me. My mom has been encouraging me to just come to the after party, not the actual church service when the First Communion is actually taking place. I couldn’t believe her when she said this. I think I know what she is up to. I think she doesn’t want me to be their when she chooses to receive Communion. My dad’s opinion is nonexistent on this matter. [/color:237w2ywt]

    #8027

    weather
    Member

    My point is people who only come to mass on Christmas and Easter(I see lots of strangers there).

    #8071

    Subvet
    Member

    Along the lines of this topic; my wife is non-Catholic and I’ll often find her struggling with our three kids (all under the age of four). Rather than leave her stranded I’ll skip Mass and help out on the home front. I admit to wondering how God would find it sinful. Any thoughts? Thanks.

    #8074

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:ndvebgcu]I would say, if you couldn’t make it due to the kids (and this has happend to me before, terrrible 2’s), try and at least watch it on television. I pray to God and let Him know that I intended to go(which I am sure He already knows), and I tell Him I will try and make it up to You with what resources I have here at home: A Bible to read the scripture reading that were being read at Mass, a televsion to at least watch Mass, along with two knees and the foor. I also try and make an extra weekday Mass. [/color:ndvebgcu]

    #8083

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    I guess I’m not there yet (our first child is only 3 months old), but I would just make them all come with me. Seriously.

    #8084

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:rm447w25]Each child is different and it also depends on how many you have. I decided about 4 months ago to drag my girl with me to the quiet room no matter how bad she was. I’m with Jon on this one because the significance of bringing them to Church on Sunday trumps their terrible moods. [/color:rm447w25]

    #8088

    LARobert
    Participant

    Back to the original question however, the magnitude of ones sin is also weighed by the circumstances.

    1. Do we know it is a sin and offends God?
    2. Do we will to offend God by doing it?

    Some things are innate, murder, robbery, unprovoked assault, these things if we are not impaired are things we always know are wrong.

    Throughout the history of the Church there have been people who have not been taught their obligations to God. To worship Him is an obligation, but if someone is not taught that it is God’s Law and a Precept of the Church to Worship Him on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, one is not held culpable.

    As another example, when I became a Catholic I was told by a priest that fleshmeats on Fridays during Lent where not permitted. I asked what fleshmeats where, he answered, “warmblooded animals” I asked the butcher if chickens where warm blooded or cold blooded, he told me cold blooded. That first Lent I ate Chicken or fish on fridays, someone who knew I had become Catholic told me I could not eat chicken, I asked the priest again, and he told me nope, no chicken, but as I had been ignorant of the law, I was not guilty of transgressing it.

    #8090

    weather
    Member

    We had 3 kids under 5 and Very seldom missed mass,at our Church they had a crying room next to the altar with a big window and speakers.

    #8147

    Subvet
    Member

    Weather, my kids are being raised Methodist so taking them to Mass with me would only complicate things.

    I’m sure that raises a few hackles so let me say I’ve discussed this with my parish priest. He pointed out; A) There is no such denomination as Metholic or Cathodist so the kids should be raised in one or the other, not to try blending them. B) My responsibility is to be the best Catholic I can be and not worry about someone else.

    Since he’s aware I reverted back to the Church AFTER this marriage I believe he knows of the tensions that are in play, especially since he himself comes from a religiously mixed marriage. From my own background of having a Catholic father and agnostic mother I can tell you that they exist, especially when one tries to impose their beliefs on the other. The priest was admonishing me to follow the example set by St. Monica, the mother of St. Augustine. In a later conversation he admitted as much.

    While going through my Third Degree for the K of C I told this to another candidate, he started to expound on his own philosophy which basically was that a marriage is like a ship and a ship has only one captain. Whatever. Having been through two dysfunctional marriages I can tell El Capitain that attitude guarantees a mutiny! But his mind was already made up regardless of any facts.

    But I do appreciate the advice given here. Thanks.

    #8170

    Benedict
    Member

    [quote:m3vgb0xu]B) My responsibility is to be the best Catholic I can be and not worry about someone else[/quote:m3vgb0xu]This is true in all cases except one’s children.

    #8172

    LARobert
    Participant

    The Scriptures do admonish us that the husband is the head of the household, and that women should be subject to their husbands. However many forget to read on about how a husband should cherish his wife. Marriage is a tough bargain when you do sharing the same faith, even more trying when you don’t. While there are standards that the Church requires, ie. your marriage should be witnessed by a priest, the non-catholic should be instructed in the Faith, not simply to attempt to convert them to the truths of the Faith, but so they will know what obligations the Catholic partner has to God, and there should be an attempt to raise any children as Catholics.

    In a world not influenced by sin and self will, we would all serve God as close and intimate friends like Adam and Eve before the Fall. We don’t live in that kind of world, nor do we always fall in love with someone who shares our beliefs and dedication to God. While it is important for Catholics to be instructed in the Faith, and to practice their Faith from a point of knowledge and love of God and His will for us, that is not always the case. Sometimes Catholics who have fallen away from the practice of their religion or are lax about their obligations marry outside of the Church and only come to a realization that their Faith is important to them after they have children. (I’m discussing this in general, I don’t know your specific case, nor would I attempt to tell you how to live your life as I am not your spiritual director, and I don’t play one on TV) What I would suggest is that you find a good confessor and spiritual director, (usually the same priest) as you look for one don’t go just on personality, or other people’s reccomendation, but pray for guidance that you find a holy priest who can help you with your spiritual life, (all of us can continue to improve our relationship with God every day) and discuss these issues with him. He may suggest things you have not thought about.

    #8192

    Bernardine
    Member

    [quote:1raa9vzq][quote:1raa9vzq]B) My responsibility is to be the best Catholic I can be and not worry about someone else[/quote:1raa9vzq]This is true in all cases except one’s children.[/quote:1raa9vzq]

    [color=darkblue:1raa9vzq]Shouldn’t we also be worried for the rest of our relatives and family members who are not Catholic and for the people who are not familiar with Christ?[/color:1raa9vzq]

    #8194

    Bernardine
    Member

    [color=darkblue:1fyip2uo]By the way, why do people get offended so easily when they find out they cannot receive Communion in the Catholic Church? I mentioned this to my aunt a couple weeks ago and she just put up this “wall” and wouldn’t take in anything I was saying. I mentioned this to another relative about a year back and she wouldn’t even reply to me she was so offended. Also, just an FYI, when I evangelize my relatives, I do so in a very soft and approachable way so as not to come off as forcing anything. I simply lead them to water and see if they drink it. They usually snicker and give a few kicks.[/color:1fyip2uo]

    #8196

    LARobert
    Participant

    [quote:206jjz0w]Shouldn’t we also be worried for the rest of our relatives and family members who are not Catholic and for the people who are not familiar with Christ?[/quote:206jjz0w]

    If we are living our Faith we do, however more than simply telling them, we should show them by our actions, if by living our Faith we show that it is a living Faith. If we pray for them, and live a life that preaches Christ by our actions, not simply our words.

    As for communion, the standard, we believe that the eucharist is what Christ said it is, His body and blood soul and divinity, and by reception of communion you are stating that not only do you believe that, but everything the Catholic Church teaches and has held since the Founding of the Church on Peter by our Lord circa 33 AD. If you can say that you believe all of that, then there should be nothing stopping you from being recieved into the Church and as a member of the Body of Christ, to receive Communnion here.

    The fact is the false ecumenical ideas floating around in Catholic and Non-Catholic circles just don’t want to hold to the above. I’ve been on flights where I’ve pulled out my breviary, and started to pray one of the Hours of the Office and had someone ask if it was a Bible, when I told them it was a Catholic prayer book that was composed of 90% Biblical passages, I get a “Well I’m a Methodist/Lutheran/Episcopal etc, and my minister/Pastor tells me that as long as you believe in the Three in One and the One are Three or something like that your a Christian, and We all really believe the same thing.” Most people don’t know what they claim holds to be true. [/code]

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