Former Protestant Pastors becoming Priest

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Victor 10 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #1002

    Victor
    Member

    I heard that the Pope allowed 75 former Protestant pastors to become Priest. Even though they are married. Anybody else hear this?

    ~Victor

    #4001

    Victor
    Member

    I forgot to mention that this is being done in the Latin Rite (US to be more specific) and I am aware that celibacy is something that the Church has the authority to change. I was just curious if this was true.

    ~Victor

    #4003

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    I’ve heard of it before and know that there are some married priests (Latin rite) because of this same thing.

    #4015

    Elkabong
    Member

    I could be wrong, but I’ve read that there are priests that are married because they came out of the Anglican or Episcopalian traditions.

    Isn’t tradition a better word than denomination?

    #4019

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:vm7nz7sk]Isn’t tradition a better word than denomination?[/quote:vm7nz7sk]
    sometimes it get mixed up with discussion on Tradition. I guess it depends. As long as someone understands the usage.

    #4064

    john81t
    Member

    I had this same concern a while back. I was told that the Church will allow a married Protestant minister who converts to the faith to become a priest and still remain married; however, this is a very restricted practice. It does not mean that the Church has dissolved its stance on the celibacy of our priests. I have been seeing our American media lamenting this stance again recently and do not doubt a lot of discussion will be on whether our new pope will ‘modernize’ the Church’s teachings that John Paul II so adamently defended. We will have to stand fast during this time as always and support our priests and bishops and new supreme pontiff when he is elected.

    #4066

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:282yz01y]I have been seeing our American media lamenting this stance again recently and do not doubt a lot of discussion will be on whether our new pope will ‘modernize’ the Church’s teachings that John Paul II so adamently defended. We will have to stand fast during this time as always and support our priests and bishops and new supreme pontiff when he is elected.[/quote:282yz01y]
    Good point, John. I didn’t even think of that during this time. I’m very intrigued to see the development of the Church over the next few months and years.

    #4129

    Fred
    Member

    [quote:17wfmsgo]I could be wrong, but I’ve read that there are priests that are married because they came out of the Anglican or Episcopalian traditions.

    Isn’t tradition a better word than denomination?[/quote:17wfmsgo]

    This and the Orthodox Rites are what I have heard.

    #4134

    Victor
    Member

    What I find very interesting is most people coming into the Catholic Church are men and women that were well aware of what they were leaving behind. (Scott Hahn, Kimberly Hahn, Tim Staples, Alex Jones, etc.). But the opposite is almost rarely the case. Most Catholics that leave the Church had an immature understanding to begin with. This is speaking in general terms. Obviously someone can point to Luther to show otherwise but there aren’t many Luther’s out there. Even then Luther didn’t fully grasp the Church’s position on Grace and so on. His writings seem to show that he first came to a good understanding of salvation in his latter years and his rejection of the Church began.

    ~Victor

    #4146

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:14fytxe8]What I find very interesting is most people coming into the Catholic Church are men and women that were well aware of what they were leaving behind. (Scott Hahn, Kimberly Hahn, Tim Staples, Alex Jones, etc.). But the opposite is almost rarely the case.[/quote:14fytxe8]
    I think you are mostly right. From what I have seen the people that join the Catholic faith are the ones who take a lot of time investigating it and praying about it.

    It *seems* many people who leave the Catholic faith already had some doubts and weren’t sure about particular things to begun with. And without further investigation from a reputable source, they get caught up in the whole “Just ask Jesus into your heart and you are saved” thing because it promises salvation right away. It’s easier than the Catholic faith.

    #4323

    [quote:2f0g9b74]What I find very interesting is most people coming into the Catholic Church are men and women that were well aware of what they were leaving behind. (Scott Hahn, Kimberly Hahn, Tim Staples, Alex Jones, etc.). But the opposite is almost rarely the case. Most Catholics that leave the Church had an immature understanding to begin with. This is speaking in general terms. Obviously someone can point to Luther to show otherwise but there aren’t many Luther’s out there. Even then Luther didn’t fully grasp the Church’s position on Grace and so on. His writings seem to show that he first came to a good understanding of salvation in his latter years and his rejection of the Church began.

    ~Victor[/quote:2f0g9b74]
    [color=darkblue:2f0g9b74]
    I know that was the case in my own life and it cost me over 34 years away from the truth before I really examined Catholic teaching and came home. If I had known then what I know now I don’t believe that I’d’ve ever left the church.

    I also have to agree with Jon that the presentation of n-C evangelism offers what seems to me to be a terribly over simplified version of Christianity. It’s more like closing a sales pitch than evangelism and that used to be my “thing” as a n-C.[/color:2f0g9b74]

    #4328

    Fred
    Member

    [quote:31ygbopp]What I find very interesting is most people coming into the Catholic Church are men and women that were well aware of what they were leaving behind. (Scott Hahn, Kimberly Hahn, Tim Staples, Alex Jones, etc.).
    [/quote:31ygbopp]

    This is where I have observed that the Church has properly and correctly educated the Faithful entering the Church. I have always been impressed at how well the “Elect” have been schooled in the Faith!

    [quote:31ygbopp]But the opposite is almost rarely the case. Most Catholics that leave the Church had an immature understanding to begin with. [/quote:31ygbopp]

    This is the Church’s greatest weakness! We “cradle Catholics” know less about our Faith then our Protestant Brother and Sisters. This is the fault of the Church. We, the Church, just are not schooling our children well! A disturbing trend I’ve noticed is that this has resulted in many of the Faithful leaving the Church seeking the knowledge and end up finding what they want elsewhere. Granted, some return to the later in life realizing the truth.

    If we would just school our child properly from the beginning and have continuing adult religious education, we would have less leave and our Faith as a community as a whole would be that greater then any other, because the truth is on our side! This is at least been my observation.

    #4343

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:44tntzw8]If we would just school our child properly from the beginning and have continuing adult religious education, we would have less leave and our Faith as a community as a whole would be that greater then any other, because the truth is on our side! This is at least been my observation.[/quote:44tntzw8]
    It’s hard to school the children when the parents don’t give a rip. It becomes an endless cycle.

    #4348

    If it’s any comfort, I attend school with a large number of kids who give a rip, even if their parent’s don’t.

    Unfortunately, they’re vastly outnumbered by the kids who don’t give a rip about religion [i:1hk3f1px]or[/i:1hk3f1px] what their parents think. It is depressing.

    #4349

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:3iq0lzji]Unfortunately, they’re vastly outnumbered by the kids who don’t give a rip about religion [i:3iq0lzji]or[/i:3iq0lzji] what their parents think. It is depressing.[/quote:3iq0lzji]
    Welcome to my world. As a youth minister I deal with all kinds of kids all day long. The kids that’s don’t give a rip make it more difficult, but they are the ones that probably need to be at religion class more than the other ones.

    #4354

    Victor
    Member

    Wousers, this is really going off topic. Hurry someone start another thread. <img src=” title=”Very Happy” />

    ~Victor

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