Benedict XVI was not a Nazi or anti-Semetic

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  • #1033

    [color=darkblue:nzv6p2i1]I wondered if any of you have heard this foolishness too and so I went and found this editorail from the Jerusalem Post
    http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite? … 78&apage=1

    JPost.com » Opinion » Article

    Apr. 20, 2005 23:13 | Updated Apr. 21, 2005 5:38
    Pope Benedict XVI

    It is a shame that some Israeli newspapers, along with some newspapers elsewhere, sensationalized the Catholic church’s choice of a new pope with headlines like, “White smoke, black past” and “From Nazi Youth to the Vatican.” Our own headline, “New pope hailed for Jewish ties,” we must say, would seem more fair and accurate.

    [b:nzv6p2i1]Pope Benedict XVI, formerly Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, is the first German pope in 1,000 years. In a 1997 book, Salt of the Earth, Ratzinger explained what happened when he was 14 years old: “When the compulsory Hitler Youth was introduced in 1941 … I was still too young, but later as a seminarian, I was registered in the Hitler Youth. As soon as I was out of the seminary, I never went back. And that was difficult because the tuition reduction, which I really needed, was tied to proof of attendance in the Hitler Youth.” Ratzinger prevailed on a sympathetic professor, who had asked him to attend just once to obtain the necessary document, to spare him even this fleeting connection with a group he evidently wanted nothing to do with.

    We do not see why the pope should be judged unfavorably for such a past. On the contrary, the new pope, like his predecessor, would seem to be acutely sensitive to the ravages of totalitarianism that he personally witnessed.
    [/b:nzv6p2i1] ([i:nzv6p2i1]Bolding mine[/i:nzv6p2i1])
    It has been pointed out that the selection of a German pope is perhaps even more momentous than was the choice of a Pole in 1978. As Charles Moore wrote in the Daily Telegraph, “Much of Polish society retained its Catholic integrity under Communist persecution. Most of German society succumbed to Hitler, compromising itself.”

    Coming from a place where Catholicism was so compromised, it is perhaps not a coincidence that Ratzinger has been known for his fierce defense of traditional Catholic doctrine against all comers, including his fellow clergy. Indeed, and also like his predecessor, Benedict XVI is expected to continue the Church’s fight for the principle of moral truth in the face of the modern world’s moral relativism.

    In the homily he gave just before the conclave that chose him for the papacy, Ratzinger said, “The small boat of thought of many Christians has often been tossed about by these waves ‚Äì thrown from one extreme to the other: from Marxism to liberalism, even to libertinism; from collectivism to radical individualism; from atheism to a vague religious mysticism; from agnosticism to syncretism, and so forth. … Having a clear faith, based on the Creed of the Church, is often labeled today as a fundamentalism. Whereas, relativism … looks like the only attitude [acceptable] to today’s standards. We are moving towards a dictatorship of relativism which does not recognize anything as for certain and which has as its highest goal one’s own ego and one’s own desires.”

    Jews, it would seem, can recognize such a spirited case for religion, a case not unlike that Judaism has made for itself throughout history.

    We should not, of course, pretend that the new pope is advocating anything but his own religion. In fact, he is credited with authoring the 2000 Vatican document “Dominus Jesus,” stating: “This truth of faith does not lessen the sincere respect which the Church has for the religions of the world, but at the same time, it rules out, in a radical way, … the belief that ‘one religion is as good as another.'”

    It should be no surprise, but also no concern, that the leader of any religion prefers his own creed to another, particularly when Benedict XVI is so personally identified with John Paul II’s expressions of respect for Judaism, Jews, and Israel.

    We hope and expect that the improvement in Catholic-Jewish relations will continue under his papacy. A German pope could be in a unique position to go even further than his predecessors in facing the Vatican’s troubled and not fully revealed role during the terrible era that he lived through as a young man. That role remains of obvious and great concern to the Jewish people.

    There’s the truth…from people who would very much know and be concerned about such a thing. Thank God for honest Jews.
    Pax vobiscum,[/color:nzv6p2i1]

    #4325

    Victor
    Member

    Even if all their assumptions were correct it would not make the office of the Pope any less. Like some Popes in the past who didn’t always behave in a Christian manner. God WILL NOT allow him (Pope) to mess up HIS Church. For he promised that “the gates of Hell shall not prevail”. Although I will add that the Holy Spirit did a wonderful job of keeping our Popes out of trouble. Out of 265 Popes only 3 (don’t quote me on this number. But somewhere around there) went down in history as being “bad Popes”. Not bad if you ask me. But even those 3 Popes did not change a thing on Catholic doctrine. They were too busy sinning….. :rolleyes:

    ~Victor

    #4329

    Fred
    Member

    Peace be with you all!

    Things like this really disappoint me and makes me loses faith in my brothers and sisters of this world. Christan and non-Christan alike. This is so over blow its almost not worthy a reply from the Vatican. But, this material, politically bias world would never relent until it got a response.

    If one reads with an open mind and heart it is very easy to not be concerned by any of this, but they love taking their shots at us. This is the cross we bear and should do so with pride and be able to help those who have no understanding understand <img src=” title=”Smile” /> I live for these time <img src=” title=”Smile” /> lol

    [quote:1mt56bgk]”When the compulsory Hitler Youth was introduced in 1941 … I was still too young, but later as a seminarian, I was registered in the Hitler Youth.”[/quote:1mt56bgk]

    Lest we forget our History, as revisionists and hate mongers want us to do, this was [b:1mt56bgk][u:1mt56bgk]compulsory[/u:1mt56bgk][/b:1mt56bgk] for all Germans, except Jews, at that time. Failure to participate or at least sign up as one had terrible consequences for both the youth and his family! Further, while he [b:1mt56bgk][u:1mt56bgk]was in seminary[/u:1mt56bgk][/b:1mt56bgk] he was registered in the Hitler Youth.

    [quote:1mt56bgk]”… I never went back. And that was difficult because the tuition reduction, which I really needed, was tied to proof of attendance in the Hitler Youth.” [/quote:1mt56bgk]

    No one has challenged this point, so it must be true <img src=” title=”Smile” /> Again compulsory and reduce cost of Seminary if he was active. Since he wasn’t he penalty was a greater cost for Seminary. Besides, think about this, it is a oxymoron for the Nazis to give a Catholic tuition to go to Seminary and create more Religious. The Nazi’s despised the Catholics near as much at the Jews.

    [quote:1mt56bgk]Ratzinger prevailed on a sympathetic professor, who had asked him to attend just once to obtain the necessary document, to spare him even this fleeting connection with a group he evidently wanted nothing to do with.[/quote:1mt56bgk]

    They want you to forget the even John Paul II had to do something similar in Poland so he could stay, study, and he had to work for the Nazis. How easy it is to forget the evil and terrible crimes against humanity that these men saw and had to endure! I would like to see the critics, and that a term that means someone who cannot do what the criticize (lol), have to survive without have to do something similar just to survive and live!

    Further, these critics cannot be expect to understand what Christ taught us, since they do not except Christ, that forgiveness and love are above all else the most important gift Christ gave us and ordered us to share! If this were not true St. Paul (Saul) would not have been forgive, become an Apostle, Martyred, and Sainted. This is where some non-Catholics and non-Christians fail to understand how a murderer, such as St. Paul, can be forgive and have major influence in the Faithful.

    Finally, and I know you can’t wait for this lol, Judge not lest ye be judged! I pray for these people everyday and encourage each of you to do the same. They truly need forgiveness, salvation, understanding, and love!

    #4336

    Icequeen
    Member

    Fred, thank you for saying exactly what I was going to say, though much more elequently than I could! I have been researching my German ancestors for the last 5 or so years. It has been my experience that anyone who was participating in certain Nazi programs (i.e. Hitler Youth or party membership), had to do this out of necessity. It was only the higher ups in these organization who really got into the Nazi agenda. The economy in Germany at that time was such that you did what you had to do for work or you starved. Hearing this Hitler Youth garbage in connection to Benedict XVI is just that, garbage. The media is relying on emotional warfare to tarnish a very good man’s reputation. In time, this will go by the wayside along with all the rest of the garbage.

    #4342

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    I read about this when the media reports were first coming out. I dismissed it as propaganda and the media just trying to create a stir.

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