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The Catholic Church has only made official statements about persons who’s souls are in heaven. This usually based on events or miracles that happen through their intercession after their death, combined with a careful examination of their lives.

Luther’s ideas that conflicted with the Scriptures and the teachings that the Catholic Church had preserved from the days of the Apostles where condemned formally. If he is in Heaven or Hell, the Church has never stated because it is God who judges our souls not us.

Some Protestants mistake an Anathema as the Church condemning someone to Hell. As the Church does not have the power to condemn someone to Hell, and unless God revealed it so the Church we will not know until the end of time, we can’t say. Anathema however is a Greek term for “Let them be cast out into the darkness”. This was used by the Church as a metaphore for being removed from the communion and community of believers, not as a physical punishment. If someone is infecting the community with something harmful, you would want to isolate them until they where no longer infectious. In the case of heretical doctine which destroys immortal souls, you don’t want someone to continue to pose a threat to the community. The harshest punishment that the Church has and the greates charity is to not allow someone to harm the souls of others.

Luther was offered many times safe conduct to explain his writings. He refused and sent letters full of foul language calling the Pope the Anti-Christ, and published comic books with pictures of the Pope with devil horns and a tail. He burned the letters from the Pope in public. He caused both spiritual and civil disruptions. A small group of German princes who where more interested in power than theology patronized him, giving him a palace to live in and all that he needed. He made friends and then broke the friendships, as an example he and John Calvin where at one point united in their attacks on the Catholic Church, but later they wrote horrible things against each other, asking God to cures the other in every possible action of life, including when they went to the bathroom. Something you would not read in most Lutheran biographies.

Still the Catholic Church has only condemned his errors in theology, and not his soul.