Latin Phrases

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  • #1928
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’ve always been curious….the A.D is used after Jesus was born, right? It’s short for “Anno Domini” if I’m not mistaken…what does this translate to?

    #9384

    “Year of the Lord”

    #9385
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks again Jon <img loading=” title=”Smile” /> I’ll try to have more Latin phrases for you guys to translate LOL <img loading=” title=”Very Happy” />

    #9386

    I don’t know too many others. I just happened to remember that one! I never studied Latin, but I have done Italian and Spanish.

    #9387
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It is commonly thought that BC stands for “before Christ” and AD stands for “after death.” This is only half correct. How could the year 1 B.C. have been “before Christ” and 1 A.D. been “after death”? BC does stand for “before Christ.” AD actually stands for the Latin phrase “anno domini” which means “in the year of our Lord.” The B.C. / A.D. dating system is not taught in the Bible. It actually was not fully implemented and accepted until several centuries after Jesus’ death.

    #9388
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    So what’s up with the “common era” thing that people are trying to establish?

    #9389

    It’s people trying to get away from the religious connotations. It’s just a secularization of it. The funny thing is that it still points to the same period of time. Whether it’s called the “Common Era” or “Year of the Lord” makes no difference to me – it all still points to Christ.

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