What’s a Catholic to do?

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  LARobert 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #956

    Anonymous

    I debated putting this post in the prayer request section. Yet since the question is big- I post it here.

    I just read clippings from another site about the resignations of two priests in MN who it seems have been running parishes reaching out to gays and lesbians, the reaching out part is fine but doing that without teaching correct Church doctrine is a sin.

    It is not just the big cities, I live in a very rural WI town. One nearby church has a priest who advocates married and women priests. Masses there also have many liturgical abuses.

    The recent election also left me to question; what’s a Catholic supposed to believe??? From every church I attended during the campaign came a different approach to some very important issues like war, abortion, marriage, embryonic stem cell study.

    I feel like such a whiner, I imagine that most folks visit this website to increase faith and educate themselves and question what is going on—-but what is to happen the the faithful, who don’t spend time outside of church reading about their faith and who trust that their pastor is teaching church doctrine, or better question yet; what happens to the faith formation of achild who goes to mass weekly- and the staff and priest instruct incorrectly?

    Just a question or two :shock:

    #3669

    Andoru
    Member

    Hi Pamela,

    I understand the gist of your concerns. In fact, I ask the same questions.

    Catholicism can be viewed as “conservative” in comparison to other denominations and religions, and that poses problems and presents internal conflicts to catholics who are more, shall we say, liberal.

    How do we attempt to reconcile these differences is something I cannot answer I’m afraid. I look forward to people’s input on this topic.

    #3670

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    Since one of my bosses is on the advisory board for priests I am privy to a bit of “inside information”. One of the priests did not retire or resign because of the gays and lesbians things, in fact I don’t think he had anything to do with that, but rather he was getting very, very tired. Apparently he felt overworked and just needed a break from the parish – understandable. Many priests are getting burnt out these days because there aren’t enough of them to go around.

    I’m not sure if advocating married or woman priests is entirely a bad thing – it is certainly worthy of discussion. Now, if this priest consumes homily time pushing this agenda, then I think he should move on to other topics.

    [quote:1skf4dhb]what happens to the faith formation of achild who goes to mass weekly- and the staff and priest instruct incorrectly?[/quote:1skf4dhb]
    Since I work in faith formation I think the bigger question is – what happens to the faith formation of a child who [i:1skf4dhb]doesn’t[/i:1skf4dhb] go to mass hardly ever and the staff or priest instruct incorrectly?

    [quote:1skf4dhb]Catholicism can be viewed as “conservative” in comparison to other denominations and religions, and that poses problems and presents internal conflicts to catholics who are more, shall we say, liberal. [/quote:1skf4dhb]
    Catholicism is also viewed as liberal in some areas as well (more politically speaking though).

    I think what we have to keep in mind is that the Catholic Church is very, very large. There will be a wide variety of opinions on particular matters that are not black and white but those opinions are still in agreement with Church doctrine.

    What we have to think about when someone teaches something in the name of the Church is “does it contradict the gospel?” If you can tell something is blatantly contradicting the core message of the faith then you know it is not truly Catholic. And in that case I think you should call the person on their words.

    However, if you are not sure of something then pray about it and research it. Get some more opinions and weigh your options.

    God is there to guide us. <img src=” title=”Smile” />

    #3673

    Andoru
    Member

    Well said Jon! <img src=” title=”Cool” />

    #10402

    I’m not sure if advocating married or woman priests is entirely a bad thing – it is certainly worthy of discussion. Now, if this priest consumes homily time pushing this agenda, then I think he should move on to other topics.

    I dont believe a priest should be advocating for anything at Mass that goes against Church doctrine…if he believes it is worthy of discussion…let him take his argument to his superiors in private instead of trying to persuade parishioners.

    #10403

    I tried to copy your response Jon and then give my view below but it appears if I simply repeated part of your answer, sorry!

    #10447

    twinc
    Participant
    "Andoru":31s6w47x wrote:
    Hi Pamela,

    I understand the gist of your concerns. In fact, I ask the same questions.

    Catholicism can be viewed as “conservative” in comparison to other denominations and religions, and that poses problems and presents internal conflicts to catholics who are more, shall we say, liberal.

    How do we attempt to reconcile these differences is something I cannot answer I’m afraid. I look forward to people’s input on this topic.[/quote:31s6w47x]
    there appears to be many ulterior motives,hidden agendas and sinister motives involved that need addressing – answers and solutions are available but not accepted – just see that with the distribution of Priests some parishes will finish up with young buoyant Priests but not very experienced or good at homilies whilst older Priests would probably be better at homilies but in either case or any case the homilies will be different – a standard homily should be circulated by the local Bishop compiled by himself or someone selected and chosen by him so everyone gets the same teaching – there now exists a disunity and not a unity amongst Catholics as to exactly what the Church actually teaches especially as regards Evolution etc – twinc

    #10450

    LARobert
    Participant
    "Andoru":1hfmrbw1 wrote:
    …Catholicism can be viewed as “conservative” in comparison to other denominations and religions, and that poses problems and presents internal conflicts to catholics who are more, shall we say, liberal.

    How do we attempt to reconcile these differences is something I cannot answer I’m afraid. I look forward to people’s input on this topic.[/quote:1hfmrbw1]
    Well conservative has been given a bad label in the past couple of decades. For the most part it is because those who label themselves are not really conservative.

    Conservare, the latin root of conservative is a process of preserving that which is good, not in ossification in which nothing changes. The Catholic Church is indeed conservative, in that it preserved the Authentic teachings of Christ, and the Apostles. The Apostles passed on what they learned from Christ, (we read in the NT that after He spoke to those Assembled that our Lord would take His close desciples aside and explain further what he had just taught. A sort of seminary formation for the Apostles.) Our Lord also promised the Holy Ghost, the paraclete would be sent to the Apostles and their successors to guide the Church.

    While the Church has not grown without any influences from the secular world, and has advanced in the fields of philosophy and Sacred Theology, so too has the Church advanced the world in areas of social and medical science.

    Some examples are slavery. From the time of Christ to our present day slavery has been part of the world we live in. While the Greeks and Pagan Romans had some limited laws that protected slaves, an owner was still legally able to beat, and even put them to death. The Church advocated in earlier days not for the absolute abolition of slavery, since it would not be recieved well, but the fair treatment of slaves. While many “Bible Believing” Protestants allowed families to be broken up, and sold, the Catholic Church admonished slave owners in Catholic lands to not break up families, to seek to convert them, and as Catholics to allow them to obtain their freedom and earn enough to purchase the freedom of their families. Later it was the Catholic Church which was the first to call for the abolition of slavery. While there were Catholics who did not want to follow or disregarded the teachings of the Church, and there is an outward appearance of a change in the teachings of the Church there really is no change at all. The primary focus of the Church is the soul, and the soul and welfare of slaves, even when the Church thought it repugnant but socially accepted is what the Church conserved.

    How does this reflect on the issue of Homosexuals and those who encourage the fable of homosexual marriage, and acceptance of their lifestyle? Well Homosexuals used to be stoned and burned at the stake by the Civil Government. At the time everyone felt that this was the appropriate way to rid moral or abberant theological problem. Catholic and Protestant countries both used capital punishment for to in their eyes protect the souls of those who would be influenced by notorius public sinners, or faulty theology .

    Today we don’t stone or burn people if they disagree, As Catholics we are encouraged by authentic Catholic teachings to love the sinner and hate the sin. So we should welcome anyone into the fold who are willing to strive to live a moral life. Too often many are willing to look the other way when a heterosexual has an affair, or fornicates, but not when homosexuals are activly invovled in their lifestyle. This double standard does little to convert anyone to a moral life. It can actually drive away some who judge the Church to not be fair when dealing with sin, and sinners. The same is true of the opposite side, where parishes and priests “welcome” active homosexuals, “As they are” without any attempt to teach authentic Catholic morality. The struggles of anyone who is tempted by any carnal sins are best left to the confessional. Not to political attacks or supports from the pulpit. Just honest and true Moral teaching and guidance from the pulpit.

    Back to the original question though. What do I think will bring an end to those who disregard the moral teachings of the Church, and parishes who don’f follow the Holy Father? In my opinion; First: prayer, most of all the rosary and offering our communions in reparation for such scandal. Making a holy hour either in front of the exposed Blessed Sacrament or our Lord in the tabernacle. Second: ask the priests in those parishes how they can justify it when the Church seems to teach something else. Don’t be confrontational, just let them tell you or you may get just a canned speech. Third: if the answer is out of step with the moral and social teachings of the Church, report it to the local Chancery, or bishop, again without any ranting or raving. If that does not work you can write your concerns and explain what you have done to Rome. At each point repeat the First Step. We should not be silent, but we should in all things be charitable. Standing up for a moral lifestyle by example and backing it up by prayer will work better than some of the baiting and antagonism that some Catholics have offered, and the absolutly unacceptable disregard for Catholic moral teachings by others.

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