The tabernacle

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Carmelite 8 years ago.

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  • #1695

    weather
    Member

    [color=blue:2pobacgg]I dont remember,were does the other religions place the sacred body of Christ after there services? [/color:2pobacgg]

    The tabernacle is to be situated “in churches in a most worthy place with the greatest honor.” The dignity, placing, and security of the Eucharistic tabernacle should foster adoration before the Lord really present in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar.

    The sacred chrism (myron), used in anointings as the sacramental sign of the seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit, is traditionally reserved and venerated in a secure place in the sanctuary. The oil of catechumens and the oil of the sick

    The tabernacle was first intended for the reservation of the Eucharist in a worthy place so that it could be brought to the sick and those absent outside of Mass. As faith in the real presence of Christ in his Eucharist deepened, the Church became conscious of the meaning of silent adoration of the Lord present under the Eucharistic species. It is for this reason that the tabernacle should be located in an especially worthy place in the church and should be constructed in such a way that it emphasizes and manifests the truth of the real presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament.

    #8447

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    Other religions don’t have the sacred Body of Christ so it really doesn’t matter.

    #8448

    LARobert
    Participant

    Some very early tabernacles where hung in the sanctuary, and where fashioned to resemble the Holy Ghost, (depicted as a dove) in Early English Churches there was a tower like structure in the sanctuary that held the Blessed Sacrament.

    #8449

    weather
    Member

    [color=blue:1tsfkwc9]Jon said,Other religions don’t have the sacred Body of Christ so it really doesn’t matter.[/color:1tsfkwc9]
    So say like the Lutherans when they receive the host what is it called?

    #8450

    LARobert
    Participant

    Lutherans except for the Swedish Lutherans did not have or maintian bishops and rejected the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Luther taught “Consubstantiation” that the bread and wine remained bread and wine, and the body of and blood of Christ remained attached to the bread and wine by the faith of the individual, and stopped having that relationship when the believer left the Church. The same sort of thing happened with the Anglicans. They denied the real presence and the nature of the priesthood, by the time that many of them came back to the teachings of the Church after they began to study authentic texts from the first and second centuries that affirmed what the Catholic Church teaches is what the Apostles and their successors taught, they no longer had real bishops to ordain priests.

    The Eastern Orthodox and the “Old Catholics” (and only to an extent among the Old Catholics, have maintained Apostolic Succession, with the intent to ordain priests who consecrate. Both of them have tebernacles too. The problem with most Old Catholics in the USA is that they have no formation, or theological backround and may or may not intend to do what the Church intends.

    #8481

    Carmelite
    Member

    The Orthodox do not keep the Blessed Sacrament in a tabernacle. They consume it all during the Mass except what will be given to the sick of the parish outside of the Church.
    Some Eastern Catholics do the same thing. The majority of Eastern Catholics do not use unleavened wafers as the Latin Church does. They use leavened loaves of bread that they cut into small pieces after the consecration.

    #8484

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    [quote:3kwlloe6]The majority of Eastern Catholics do not use unleavened wafers as the Latin Church does. They use leavened loaves of bread that they cut into small pieces after the consecration.[/quote:3kwlloe6]
    I thought the sacrament was valid only if unleavened bread was used.

    #8488

    LARobert
    Participant

    For validity the bread must be wheat bread, the wine in both east and west must be grape, and have no additives or special starters, just grapes and the natural yeasts that cause the fermenting of the wine. In the East yeast bread is required. In the west we use unleavened bread. In the west it is illicit to use leven in the bread used for the Eucarist, and in most of the east it is illicit to use unleavened bread. Many in the east believe that the last supper was the night before the passover seder, in the west we have always interpreted the last supper to have taken place on the first night of Passover. (Remember the Jewish day begins from sundown to sundown, not at midnight.) All Jewish festivals begin at sundown.

    Some Eastern Catholic and Orthodox do reserve the Blessed Sacrament. In some of the Churches they which have a large enough altar they have tabernacles (many look like a small golden model of a church,) others have a small box on the altar surrounded by a throne which they refer to as a casket, a few have a hanging aumbry in the shape of a dove. Some do not have any and the priest reserves some of the consecrated bread in the rectory in a special shrine. As there was never a denyal of the real presence in the East like among the Protestants in the west, the cult of the Blessed Sacrament, or the external manifestations of devotion like exposition, benediction, Corpus Christi etc did not develop to manifest the devotion and to support the traditional belief.

    [url:27jmg5my]http://artemis.crosslink.net/~hrycak/bldg.html[/url:27jmg5my]
    See this webpage for more on the Eastern Catholic Sanctuary

    #8490

    Carmelite
    Member

    [quote:3qpwg6p6]
    Some Eastern Catholic and Orthodox do reserve the Blessed Sacrament. [/quote:3qpwg6p6]

    My understanding is that the Orthodox reserve it only to be given to the sick. They do not reserve it for the adoration of the faithful as in the Catholic Church. Also, it is not easy to reserve the Blessed Sacrament in the form of leavened bread for long. It will get hard like any other bread. That is not the case with wafers which are hard to start with.
    Some Eastern Catholics reserve the Blessed Sacrament eg. the Maronite Church (using wafers) and others do not eg. the Coptic Catholic Church (using leavened bread).

    #8491

    LARobert
    Participant

    [quote:1q0y4oae][quote:1q0y4oae]
    Some Eastern Catholic and Orthodox do reserve the Blessed Sacrament. [/quote:1q0y4oae]

    My understanding is that the Orthodox reserve it only to be given to the sick. They do not reserve it for the adoration of the faithful as in the Catholic Church. Also, it is not easy to reserve the Blessed Sacrament in the form of leavened bread for long. It will get hard like any other bread. That is not the case with wafers which are hard to start with.
    Some Eastern Catholics reserve the Blessed Sacrament eg. the Maronite Church (using wafers) and others do not eg. the Coptic Catholic Church (using leavened bread).[/quote:1q0y4oae]

    When an eastern rite or Orthodox priest takes communion to the sick, most of the Byzantine rites also take a portable kit which has a small chalice and spoon, as well as some non-consecrated wine to moisten the consecrated bread. While adoration is not a major theme in the East, once again because they did not have heresies that denied the real presence, they do accept the real presence and do reverence the Blessed Sacrament. All in all the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament differs from Rite to Rite, and sometimes within a rite when there is no universal rubric within the rite.

    #8492

    Carmelite
    Member

    [quote:1259t70q]
    When an eastern rite or Orthodox priest takes communion to the sick, most of the Byzantine rites also take a portable kit which has a small chalice and spoon, as well as some non-consecrated wine to moisten the consecrated bread. While adoration is not a major theme in the East, once again because they did not have heresies that denied the real presence, they do accept the real presence and do reverence the Blessed Sacrament. All in all the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament differs from Rite to Rite, and sometimes within a rite when there is no universal rubric within the rite.[/quote:1259t70q]

    Historically, all of Christendom did not reserve the Blessed Sacrament for adoration. That developed in the West. The tabernacle was used by the early Christians to reserve the Blessed Sacrament, in order to bring it to the sick.
    Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament is found in the Latin Church and in the Maronite Church.

    [color=darkred:1259t70q]The tabernacle was first intended for the reservation of the Eucharist in a worthy place so that it could be brought to the sick and those absent outside of Mass. As faith in the real presence of Christ in his Eucharist deepened, the Church became conscious of the meaning of silent adoration of the Lord present under the Eucharistic species. [/color:1259t70q]
    http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a3.htm

    [color=blue:1259t70q]In the Latin Church, as even today in the Eastern Church, the reservation of the Eucharistic Host had not been for public veneration but for communion of the sick. Gradually, however, customs of worshipping the Blessed Sacrament in the tabernacle and the monstrance were created at the request of contemplatives and became popular throughout the Latin rites. [/color:1259t70q]
    http://www.catholic.net/RCC/Periodicals … icle2.html

    #8497

    LARobert
    Participant

    I don’t think I was arguing any point contrary to your well researched posting. (at least I don’t take your posting as a rebuttal to my posting).

    I do find it interesting to read in Section 1381 the English Translation of the Adoro Te of St. Thomas. It is just as theologically sound as the Latin, but does not have the same (worshipful) ring or cadence in english.

    It is very interesting to see in the development of doctrine how one aspect of a doctrine gets emphasized as a response to heretical teachings. As a case in point I was discussing with a schismatic bishop the rite of baptism and his refusal to accept the baptism of any Catholic who was baptized in the Post Vatican II rite. His rationale was, he had seen a pamphlet that was left over after a baptism, which summarized (at least in part, as I did not have the opportunity to read it myself) baptism as being a rite which initiated the new Catholic into the Church. He protested that it was heretical to describe baptism as such, baptism he protested was the sacrament that cleanses us from original and actual sin, (actual in the case of someone who has reached the age of reason). My comment to him was that both are correct, as the sacrament does both of these things, and others, so a denyal of the effects of a sacrament because only one aspect of the sacrament is discussed (in this case) showed his own ignorance of theology, (As an aside, he is one of these “Traditionalist” Sede Vacante bishops who has no seminary training, he simply worked as a hotel manager until he decided that the Church was going in a wrong direction and found out about the “Old Catholics” and went out and got himself ordained with no strings attached.)

    Likewise, (to get back on topic) there are many truths about the Eucharist, it is a source and symbol of our unity, it is a symbol of spiritual nourishment, as well as being the actual body and blood, soul and divinity of Christ Jesus, and source of true spiritual nourishment and graces. The fact that there where not any major heretical teachings about the sacrament in the east, and the minimal Latinizations in some communities vs the enforced Latinizations of some Eastern Catholics would explan (historically) some of the crossover where Eucharistic adoration is practiced in the East. The relative calm regarding the lack of challanges to the Real Presence in the east also exibits itself in a less developed Eucharistic Cultus in the East, which should not be interpreted as a lack of belief.

    #8507

    Carmelite
    Member

    [quote:1r7sizqo]I don’t think I was arguing any point contrary to your well researched posting. (at least I don’t take your posting as a rebuttal to my posting). [/quote:1r7sizqo]

    You are right.
    I was trying to clarify and add information to the previous posts.

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