Pope allows condom use?

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  • #1801

    weather
    Member

    :rolleyes:
    I heard recently that the Pope has allowed the use of condoms to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS.

    A few articles on the net seem to confirm this, and others say indefinite statements.

    Is this true?

    Are there any official statements on this matter?

    What are the implications of this do you think?

    #8797

    LARobert
    Participant

    I do recall that there was speculation at a Synod of bishops held in Rome as to if the Church should consider the issue, but I don’t recall anything ever coming of it. Definatly no statement by the Pope approving the use of Condoms as a deterrant for STDs and HIV transmission.

    #8799

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    I think if there was a statement from the pope approving use of condoms it would have been major news.

    #8803

    weather
    Member

    Vatican preparing document on condom use and AIDS, official says

    By John Thavis
    Catholic News Service

    VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Benedict XVI has asked a commission of scientific and theological experts to prepare a document on condom use and AIDS prevention, a Vatican official said.

    Cardinal Javier Lozano Barragan, head of the Pontifical Council for Health Care Ministry, said the document would focus, at least in part, on condom use by married couples when one spouse is infected.

    He said the document would be made public soon, but refused to give details about the commission’s conclusions.

    Cardinal Lozano was responding to questions in the wake of an interview by Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini, retired archbishop of Milan, who said use of condoms can be the lesser evil in some situations.

    Cardinal Lozano spoke in an interview April 23 with the Rome newspaper La Repubblica. He was asked specifically about use of condoms by married couples seeking to prevent transmission of AIDS.

    “It’s a very difficult and delicate theme that requires prudence,” Cardinal Lozano said.

    “My council is studying this attentively with scientists and theologians expressly charged with preparing a document on the subject, which will be made public soon,” he said.

    “It was Pope Benedict who asked us to make a study on this particular aspect of the use of condoms by those with AIDS and other infectious diseases,” he said.

    In recent years, even as Vatican officials have criticized anti-AIDS condom campaigns, several bishops, theologians and Vatican officials have said they could envision situations in which condom use to prevent AIDS would be the “lesser evil” that can be tolerated.

    Cardinal Lozano, for example, said in 2005 that if a husband had AIDS, it was a woman’s right to ask him to use a condom.

    In the context of married love, the church teaches that contraceptive techniques, including condoms, are immoral because they close off the possibility of procreation.

    Some theologians, including those who are consultors to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, have been among those suggesting that condom use by married couples may be acceptable when the intention is to prevent a deadly disease and not to prevent procreation.

    Cardinal Martini told the Italian magazine Espresso that a spouse infected with HIV has an obligation to protect his or her partner.

    At the same time, Cardinal Martini questioned whether religious leaders should promote anti-AIDS condom campaigns, because he said they risk promoting sexual irresponsibility.

    That has been the primary argument of other church leaders, who have also said — as Pope Benedict did last June — that chastity and fidelity are the only fail-safe ways to prevent the spread of the disease.

    In his interview with Espresso, Cardinal Martini also spoke at length about abortion. While calling for every effort to reduce the number of abortions, he said decriminalizing the practice has had the positive effect of reducing the number of clandestine abortions.

    Decriminalizing abortion does not represent a “license to kill,” he said. He said it means the state does not feel it necessary to intervene in every possible case; instead, he said, the state tries to eliminate the causes of abortions and prevents them from being carried out after a certain point in pregnancy.

    Cardinal Martini also said that while one must do “whatever is possible and reasonable to defend and save every human life,” there were complex and painful situations that require careful reflection and decisions on what is best for the person and what “concretely serves to protect or promote human life.”

    “It is important to recognize that the continuation of physical human life is not in itself the first and absolute principle. Above it stands human dignity, a dignity that in the Christian vision and that of many religions involves an openness to the eternal life that God promises to man,” he said.

    Physical human life should be respected and defended, he added, “but it is not the supreme and absolute value.”

    Cardinal Martini said he did not believe the principles of self-defense or “lesser evil” could be applied to cases of abortion, unless the mother’s life was actually threatened by carrying the pregnancy to term.

    Even when a mother cannot care for a child, he said, there are other ways in modern society for the child to be raised.

    “But in any case I hold that respect is due to any person who, perhaps after much reflection and suffering, in these extreme cases follows their conscience, even if the person decides to do something that I cannot approve,” he said.

    The Espresso interview was conducted as a dialogue between Cardinal Martini and Italian bioethicist Ignazio Marino. In it, the cardinal touched on a number of other issues:

    — The cardinal said he agreed with Marino that it appeared that individual human life began sometime after the joining of sperm and egg. In particular, Cardinal Martini said he agreed that a new individual did not seem to be present in a fertilized egg before the male and female nuclei had combined to form the new embryo’s nuclei. That is an argument made by some scientists who are promoting new, more sophisticated forms of artificial insemination. Cardinal Martini said a more precise understanding of when individual human life begins could help overcome the church’s opposition to every form of artificial insemination.

    — The cardinal said the implantation of frozen embryos, so-called embryonic adoption, was preferable to simply letting the embryos perish — even when the mothers are single.

    — On the question of allowing single people to adopt children, the cardinal said adoption by married couples was generally preferable, but that he would not want to exclude the possibility for singles. It’s a question of making the best choice for the child, he said.
    http://www.catholicnews.com/data/storie … 602330.htm

    #8804

    LARobert
    Participant

    [i:2flws6oa][b:2flws6oa]He said the document would be made public soon, but refused to give details about the commission’s conclusions. [/b:2flws6oa][/i:2flws6oa]

    The article covers both speculation and the personal opinion of a variety of clerics, Cardinal Martini, a noted liberal who has been described as follows……

    Often considered to be one of the more liberal members of the College of Cardinals, and prelates in general, he has achieved widespread notice for his wide-ranging and open-minded writings, earning him popularity in some circles, criticism in others. On occasion Martini’s viewpoints have proven to be somewhat controversial, thus bringing him comparatively large amounts of media coverage.

    In April 2006, in response to a very specific question from the bioethicist Ignazio Marino, director of the transplant center of the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, Martini admitted that in certain cases, the usage of condoms might be allowable stating, “The use of condoms can, in certain situations, be a lesser evil”.[1] He stressed the particular case of married couples where one has HIV or AIDS.[2] But he quickly noted that it’s one thing the principle of the lesser evil in such cases, and quite another the subject who has to convey those things publicly, thus it is not up to the Church authorities to support condom use publicly, because of “the risk of promoting an irresponsible attitude”. The Church is more likely to support other morally sustainable means, such as abstinence.[3] On another occasion the Cardinal also stated that “I believe the Church’s teaching has not been expressed so well… I am confident we will find some formula to state things better, so that the problem is better understood and more adapted to reality,” earning him a reputation for having a more liberal stance toward contraception.[4] The Cardinal’s position on the start of a distinct human life during the fetilization of oocytes was rebuked by certain Vatican officials.[5] Some of Martini’s other positions may have frustrated Church leaders, but official response from the Roman Curia was limited.

    Cardinal Martini, speaking about the right to die debate said that “terminally ill patients should be given the right to refuse treatments and that the doctors who assist them should be protected by law.”[6]

    He has also called for greater collegiality in the governance of the Church and for the possibility of female deacons to be examined.[7]

    In March 2007 he openly criticised the attitude of the Church authorities, whilst speaking at the basilica of the Nativity to a congregation of over 1,300 visitors, he remarked that “The Church does not give orders.” Martini also stated that “It is necessary to listen to others, and when speaking to use terms that they understand.” These remarks came days after Pope Benedict XVI published the 140 page ‘Apostolic Exhortation.’ Some interpreted this document as being an attempt to influence Catholic politicians, particularly at a time when Italian government was trying to pass legislation offering legal recognition of same sex unions.[8]

    Cardinal Martini has been critical of the style in which the Church is organized, seeing it as being far too centralized. [i:2flws6oa]Throughout his career Martini has established a reputation that demonstrates a desire to maintain an open dialogue about contraception, human sexuality and women’s role in the church, among other contentious issues[/i:2flws6oa], many consider that Martini may yearn for another Vatican council. Furthermore, he has also called for the church to take a greater role in combating social injustice, often calling for greater action to be taking in assisting the immigrants, minorities and the combating of racism. Martini wishes for the church to rekindle the “burning fire in the heart.”

    1. BBC. Cardinal backs limited condom use April 21, 2006
    2. L’Espresso. When Does Life Begin? Cardinal Martini Replies May 20, 2006
    3. BBC. Profile: Cardinal Carlo Martini April 19, 2005
    4. L’Espresso. Carlo Maria Martini’s “Day After” May 20, 2006
    5. National Catholic Reporter. The schism that hasn’t been between Ratzinger and Martini February 20, 2007
    6. Catholic World News. Cardinal Martini repeats call for decentralized Church government April 7, 2004
    7. PinkNews. Cardinal says Pope should stop giving orders March 16, 2007

    #8806

    Andres Ortiz
    Keymaster

    Robert, is that from Wikipedia?

    #8807

    LARobert
    Participant

    Yes, not always an unbiased source. However it was cut and pasted to Wikipedia from another source that I read some time around the election of Pope Benedict, with only minor changes. I will hopefully be able to find the original that Wikipedia got the information from. (Sorry I forgot to post the source in the original posting.) I’m usually a little more careful about sources.

    While I did use part of the Wikipedia article as a source for the statements about Cardinal Martini’s liberal bias, and statements that many would see as counter to what the Church holds, I started the search for material based on a vauge memory that at the Conclaves that elected Popes John Paul I and John Paul II his name was bantered around by the press, to the delight of the Left and the horror of the Traditionalist communities.

    #8808

    Carmelite
    Member
    "weather":37z4q4wb wrote:
    Vatican preparing document on condom use and AIDS, official says

    By John Thavis
    Catholic News Service

    VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Benedict XVI has asked a commission of scientific and theological experts to prepare a document on condom use and AIDS prevention, a Vatican official said.

    Cardinal Javier Lozano Barragan, head of the Pontifical Council for Health Care Ministry, said the document would focus, at least in part, on condom use by married couples when one spouse is infected.

    He said the document would be made public soon, but refused to give details about the commission’s conclusions.

    Cardinal Lozano was responding to questions in the wake of an interview by Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini, retired archbishop of Milan, who said use of condoms can be the lesser evil in some situations.

    Cardinal Lozano spoke in an interview April 23 with the Rome newspaper La Repubblica. He was asked specifically about use of condoms by married couples seeking to prevent transmission of AIDS.

    “It’s a very difficult and delicate theme that requires prudence,” Cardinal Lozano said.

    “My council is studying this attentively with scientists and theologians expressly charged with preparing a document on the subject, which will be made public soon,” he said.

    “It was Pope Benedict who asked us to make a study on this particular aspect of the use of condoms by those with AIDS and other infectious diseases,” he said.

    In recent years, even as Vatican officials have criticized anti-AIDS condom campaigns, several bishops, theologians and Vatican officials have said they could envision situations in which condom use to prevent AIDS would be the “lesser evil” that can be tolerated.

    Cardinal Lozano, for example, said in 2005 that if a husband had AIDS, it was a woman’s right to ask him to use a condom.

    In the context of married love, the church teaches that contraceptive techniques, including condoms, are immoral because they close off the possibility of procreation.

    Some theologians, including those who are consultors to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, have been among those suggesting that condom use by married couples may be acceptable when the intention is to prevent a deadly disease and not to prevent procreation.

    Cardinal Martini told the Italian magazine Espresso that a spouse infected with HIV has an obligation to protect his or her partner.

    At the same time, Cardinal Martini questioned whether religious leaders should promote anti-AIDS condom campaigns, because he said they risk promoting sexual irresponsibility.

    That has been the primary argument of other church leaders, who have also said — as Pope Benedict did last June — that chastity and fidelity are the only fail-safe ways to prevent the spread of the disease.

    In his interview with Espresso, Cardinal Martini also spoke at length about abortion. While calling for every effort to reduce the number of abortions, he said decriminalizing the practice has had the positive effect of reducing the number of clandestine abortions.

    Decriminalizing abortion does not represent a “license to kill,” he said. He said it means the state does not feel it necessary to intervene in every possible case; instead, he said, the state tries to eliminate the causes of abortions and prevents them from being carried out after a certain point in pregnancy.

    Cardinal Martini also said that while one must do “whatever is possible and reasonable to defend and save every human life,” there were complex and painful situations that require careful reflection and decisions on what is best for the person and what “concretely serves to protect or promote human life.”

    “It is important to recognize that the continuation of physical human life is not in itself the first and absolute principle. Above it stands human dignity, a dignity that in the Christian vision and that of many religions involves an openness to the eternal life that God promises to man,” he said.

    Physical human life should be respected and defended, he added, “but it is not the supreme and absolute value.”

    Cardinal Martini said he did not believe the principles of self-defense or “lesser evil” could be applied to cases of abortion, unless the mother’s life was actually threatened by carrying the pregnancy to term.

    Even when a mother cannot care for a child, he said, there are other ways in modern society for the child to be raised.

    “But in any case I hold that respect is due to any person who, perhaps after much reflection and suffering, in these extreme cases follows their conscience, even if the person decides to do something that I cannot approve,” he said.

    The Espresso interview was conducted as a dialogue between Cardinal Martini and Italian bioethicist Ignazio Marino. In it, the cardinal touched on a number of other issues:

    — The cardinal said he agreed with Marino that it appeared that individual human life began sometime after the joining of sperm and egg. In particular, Cardinal Martini said he agreed that a new individual did not seem to be present in a fertilized egg before the male and female nuclei had combined to form the new embryo’s nuclei. That is an argument made by some scientists who are promoting new, more sophisticated forms of artificial insemination. Cardinal Martini said a more precise understanding of when individual human life begins could help overcome the church’s opposition to every form of artificial insemination.

    — The cardinal said the implantation of frozen embryos, so-called embryonic adoption, was preferable to simply letting the embryos perish — even when the mothers are single.

    — On the question of allowing single people to adopt children, the cardinal said adoption by married couples was generally preferable, but that he would not want to exclude the possibility for singles. It’s a question of making the best choice for the child, he said.
    http://www.catholicnews.com/data/storie … 602330.htm[/quote:37z4q4wb]
    [b:37z4q4wb]
    [i:37z4q4wb]Church ‘will not budge one inch’ on issue of condom use, says Cardinal Lopez Trujillo[/b:37z4q4wb]
    The cardinal told RCN that the Vatican “maintains unmodified the teaching on condoms” and said the recent statements by Italian Cardinal Maria Martini “are nothing more than his own personal opinions which do not reflect [Church] teaching.”

    Cardinal Lopez Trujillo said Pope Benedict XVI has not ordered any studies about modifying the prohibition on condom use. “As a dicastery we do not have any instruction or any indication to the contrary, to carry out a study about something new with regards to condoms,” he stated.

    The Colombian prelate said Cardinal Martini “should explain how the condom prevents AIDS if it is true he said it is a lesser evil.”[/i:37z4q4wb]
    http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/new.php?n=6641

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