Are you a practicing Catholic?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Fred 9 years ago.

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  • #1276

    weather
    Member

    1. You shall attend Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation. I see certain people at mass only at Christmas and Easter.

    2. You shall confess your sins at least once a year.

    3. You shall humbly receive your Creator in Holy Communion at least during the Easter season.

    4. You shall keep holy the holy days of obligation.

    5. You shall observe the prescribed days of fasting and abstinence.

    6. The faithful also have the duty of providing for the material needs of the Church, each according to his or her abilities.

    Here are the top five ways to know if you are a practicing Catholic. There are many other ways to such as respecting others, loving others, being charitable and more. If you want to be a practicing Catholic, you might want to consider working on these things to be one.

    1. Attending Mass – Going to Mass isn’t just when it’s easy for you to go or on a holiday. Attending Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation is an obligation of Catholics. In fact, if you are Catholic, it is a sin to miss Mass unless for a valid reason. Practicing Catholics attend Mass weekly and on Holy Days of Obligation unless for a valid reason such as sickness, weather, or some extraordinary reason.

    2. Pro-Life – Abortion is a very controversial topic, however, the Catholic Church has made their teaching on abortion, in vitro fertilization, and euthanasia very clear. To be a practicing Catholic, one must be pro-life. Being pro-life means not supporting the legal right to abort and protecting the dignity of life.

    3. Confession – A practicing Catholic should participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation at least once a year. This sacrament gives you forgiveness of sins.

    4. Eucharist – A practicing Catholic knows that the Eucharist is the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ. Many practicing Catholics take the Eucharist weekly and some even daily. You should at least take the Eucharist once during the Easter season.

    5. Attitude – being a practicing Catholic does not mean that one is perfect. A practicing Catholic strives to do as God wants us to do: live an honest, loving life. We should love others, respect others, and obey the Ten Commandments. We shouldn’t judge or be hateful toward others.

    #6450

    Te Deum
    Member

    1. I attend Mass weekly. Usually I try to attend some other Masses during the week, besides Sunday, whenever I can. I’m conscious of my obligation as a catholic to do it, but I’m more than happy to be able to attend it, every time.

    2. I go to confession whenever I feel I’m needing it. Besides cleansing me, it strengthens me so that I may sin less. So, definitely more than once a year, for sure.

    3. I make a conscious effort in order to be ready as to properly receive the Blood and Body of Christ in Holy Communion at least once a week (Sundays usually).

    4. I take religion seriously, because I take truth seriously. With my never-ending flaws, I try to «be holy as our Father is Holy», like Christ commanded. I beg constantly for His grace and help, so that I can avoid sin and temptations and do more good. So, I do my best to keep holy the holy days.

    5. I’m more than glad to fast and abstain for the sake of God and His Church. It’s cleansing and strengthens our faith.

    6. Whenever I can, I provide with the little I have for the parrish’s needs. Recently, I’ve volunteered to give some cathechesis classes to children.

    I’m also continuously pledging myself and renewing my oaths as a Christian before God, so that I may, with His help and grace, respect others, love others, be actively charitable, be meek in heart, not be judge mental and spread the Good News to all people, as He commanded.

    Obviously I’m also against abortion, euthanasia, in vitro fertilization, contraception and all those issues that the Church has made in their teaching very clear.

    So I’d say that I try to be as good and practicing as a catholic that God, in His infinite grace and mercy, helps me to be; despite my embarassing and offensive sins, vanity, stupidity, stubbornness and weak character.

    #6451

    Victor
    Member

    [quote:2to1rgt3]1. I attend Mass weekly. Usually I try to attend some other Masses during the week, besides Sunday, whenever I can. I’m conscious of my obligation as a catholic to do it, but I’m more than happy to be able to attend it, every time.

    2. I go to confession whenever I feel I’m needing it. Besides cleansing me, it strengthens me so that I may sin less. So, definitely more than once a year, for sure.

    3. I make a conscious effort in order to be ready as to properly receive the Blood and Body of Christ in Holy Communion at least once a week (Sundays usually).

    4. I take religion seriously, because I take truth seriously. With my never-ending flaws, I try to «be holy as our Father is Holy», like Christ commanded. I beg constantly for His grace and help, so that I can avoid sin and temptations and do more good. So, I do my best to keep holy the holy days.

    5. I’m more than glad to fast and abstain for the sake of God and His Church. It’s cleansing and strengthens our faith.

    6. Whenever I can, I provide with the little I have for the parrish’s needs. Recently, I’ve volunteered to give some cathechesis classes to children.

    I’m also continuously pledging myself and renewing my oaths as a Christian before God, so that I may, with His help and grace, respect others, love others, be actively charitable, be meek in heart, not be judge mental and spread the Good News to all people, as He commanded.

    Obviously I’m also against abortion, euthanasia, in vitro fertilization, contraception and all those issues that the Church has made in their teaching very clear.

    So I’d say that I try to be as good and practicing as a catholic that God, in His infinite grace and mercy, helps me to be; despite my embarassing and offensive sins, vanity, stupidity, stubbornness and weak character.[/quote:2to1rgt3]

    [color=darkblue:2to1rgt3]I’m going to borrow [i:2to1rgt3]Te Deum[/i:2to1rgt3] response and second that. My responses would run similar to his.[/color:2to1rgt3]

    #6566

    Dave
    Member

    [quote:2q2pq51i]1. Attending Mass – Going to Mass isn’t just when it’s easy for you to go or on a holiday. Attending Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation is an obligation of Catholics. In fact, if you are Catholic, it is a sin to miss Mass unless for a valid reason. Practicing Catholics attend Mass weekly and on Holy Days of Obligation unless for a valid reason such as sickness, weather, or some extraordinary reason. [/quote:2q2pq51i]

    Does the internet count? Any reason it shouldn’t?

    [quote:2q2pq51i]2. Pro-Life – Abortion is a very controversial topic, however, the Catholic Church has made their teaching on abortion, in vitro fertilization, and euthanasia very clear. To be a practicing Catholic, one must be pro-life. Being pro-life means not supporting the legal right to abort and protecting the dignity of life.[/quote:2q2pq51i]

    I should think being a practicing [b:2q2pq51i]human being[/b:2q2pq51i] should be enough for someone to be pro-life. To me it’s just one of those obvious things, like pro-food and pro-swimming pools.

    [quote:2q2pq51i]We shouldn’t judge[/quote:2q2pq51i]

    I take issue with this. Many people love to say that, and I feel it’s a cop-out. Humans should be judging each other on a daily basis. This Earth can only be a better place if one man judges another man foolish for obviously foolish things like stealing, drugs, and driving hybrids in the fast lane.

    #6601

    Fred
    Member

    Peace be with you all!

    [quote:1raqq64h]weather wrote:
    1. Attending Mass – Going to Mass isn’t just when it’s easy for you to go or on a holiday. Attending Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation is an obligation of Catholics. In fact, if you are Catholic, it is a sin to miss Mass unless for a valid reason. Practicing Catholics attend Mass weekly and on Holy Days of Obligation unless for a valid reason such as sickness, weather, or some extraordinary reason.

    Does the internet count? Any reason it shouldn’t? [/quote:1raqq64h]

    First [i:1raqq64h][b:1raqq64h]”attend”[/b:1raqq64h][/i:1raqq64h] is the wrong wording, we must [u:1raqq64h][i:1raqq64h][b:1raqq64h]”participate”[/b:1raqq64h][/i:1raqq64h][/u:1raqq64h] in the Mass.

    [quote:1raqq64h]”Sunday is the day on which the paschal mystery is celebrated in light of the apostolic tradition and is to be observed as the foremost holy day of obligation in the universal Church.” Moreover, “On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are bound to participate in the Mass…”.[/quote:1raqq64h]

    To participate, on must receive the Holy Eucharist. I know of no way this can be done via the Internet. <img src=” title=”Smile” />

    [quote:1raqq64h] “Those who deliberately fail in this obligation commit grave sin”[/quote:1raqq64h]

    And grave sin is indeed mortal sin. Pope John Paul, The Great, repeated this precept in his apostolic letter Dies Domini (Observing and Celebrating the Day of the Lord, #47, 1998).



    [quote:1raqq64h]I should think being a practicing human being should be enough for someone to be pro-life. To me it’s just one of those obvious things, like pro-food and pro-swimming pools.[/quote:1raqq64h]

    If I understand you comment correctly, then no it is not obvious. If it were, there would be no debate. This is why one must open declare and support this belief. To me it is obvious that Pro-Choice = Pro Murder. That is because I, and practicing Catholics, believe that life starts at conception.



    [quote:1raqq64h]I take issue with this. Many people love to say that, and I feel it’s a cop-out. Humans should be judging each other on a daily basis. This Earth can only be a better place if one man judges another man foolish for obviously foolish things like stealing, drugs, and driving hybrids in the fast lane.[/quote:1raqq64h]

    Dave we cannot succumb to self interpretation of our belief. There has been almost 2000 years of scholarly work done on our Faith and why we know these thing to be true. Further, we can trace ourselves directly to the Apostles, hence, the Church has authority to teach us these truths. We do not have authority to reinterpret or self interpret outside of Church teaching. We must believe:

    [quote:1raqq64h] 3 … “Amen, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, 3 you will not enter the kingdom of heaven. 4 Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. [/quote:1raqq64h]

    In other words our faith must be that of a child. I offer this to you as why we cannot judge as you suggest:

    [quote:1raqq64h] 1 “Stop judging, that you may not be judged. 2 For as you judge, so will you be judged, and the measure with which you measure will be measured out to you. 3 Why do you notice the splinter in your brother’s eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own eye? 4 How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me remove that splinter from your eye,’ while the wooden beam is in your eye? 5 You hypocrite, 3 remove the wooden beam from your eye first; then you will see clearly to remove the splinter from your brother’s eye.[/quote:1raqq64h]

    God Bless!

    #6602

    Benedict
    Member

    [quote:3g76otou]To participate, on must receive the Holy Eucharist.[/quote:3g76otou]
    Not quite. Those who, in a state of mortal sin, (rightly) refrain from recieving the Eucharist do not fail in their obligation to participate in Sunday mass, so reception of the Eucharist is not the criterion by which participation is measured.

    #6604

    Fred
    Member

    Peace be with all!

    [quote:3k0vgpg2][quote:3k0vgpg2]To participate, on must receive the Holy Eucharist.[/quote:3k0vgpg2]
    Not quite. Those who, in a state of mortal sin, (rightly) refrain from receiving the Eucharist do not fail in their obligation to participate in Sunday mass, so reception of the Eucharist is not the criterion by which participation is measured.[/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    This is true that we are required by the Church to receive the Eucharist at certain time of the year:

    [quote:3k0vgpg2]Innocent III, mitigated the former severity of the Church’s law to the extent that all Catholics of both sexes were to communicate at least once a year and this during the paschal season[/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    and that St. Augustine left daily Communion to the free choice of the individual but said:

    [quote:3k0vgpg2]Sic vive, ut quotidie possis sumere, i e “So live that you may receive every day.”[/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    But the Mass is the celebration of the Eucharist and what is the point in attending if you do not receive? Of course Mortal Sin is the exception, but, regular Reconciliation would help to remove that problem. Also:

    [quote:3k0vgpg2]Though Holy Communion does not per se remit mortal sin, it has nevertheless the third effect of “blotting out venial sin and preserving the soul from mortal sin.[/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    [quote:3k0vgpg2]…he allows and recommends daily Communion to the entire laity and requires but two conditions for its permissibility, namely, the state of grace and a right and pious intention. Concerning the non-requirement of the twofold species as a means necessary to salvation see COMMUNION UNDER BOTH KINDS[/url:3k0vgpg2].[/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    The Eucharist is defined as:

    [quote:3k0vgpg2]The name given to the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar in its twofold aspect of sacrament and Sacrifice of Mass, and in which Jesus Christ is truly present under the bread and wine. Other titles are used, such as “Lord’s Supper” (Coena Domini), “Table of the Lord” (Mensa Domini), the “Lord’s Body” (Corpus Domini), and the “Holy of Holies” (Sanctissimum), to which may be added the following expressions, and somewhat altered from their primitive meaning: “Agape” (Love-Feast), “Eulogia” (Blessing), “Breaking of Bread”, “Synaxis” (Assembly), etc.; but the ancient title “Eucharistia” appearing in writers as early as Ignatius, Justin, and Iren?¶us, has taken precedence in the technical terminology of the Church and her theologians. The expression “Blessed Sacrament of the Altar”, introduced by Augustine, is at the present day almost entirely restricted to catechetical and popular treatises. This extensive nomenclature, describing the great mystery from such different points of view, is in itself sufficient proof of the central position the Eucharist has occupied from the earliest ages, both in the Divine worship and services of the Church and in the life of faith and devotion which animates her members.

    Also Thanksgiving.[b:3k0vgpg2]**[/b:3k0vgpg2][/quote:3k0vgpg2]

    With this, and many other examples, I believe that partaking of the Holy Eucharist can be a criterion of participation. But I coincide, it is not expressly stated as such, that I have been able to locate. <img src=” title=”Smile” />

    God Bless!

    [i:3k0vgpg2]*denotes a quote taken from The Blessed Eucharist as a Sacrament[/url:3k0vgpg2]
    ** quoted from
    Eucharist[/url[/i:3k0vgpg2]

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